Tag Archives: Inspirational

AWAKENING TO OUR WISHES

“Stop the habit of wishful thinking and start the habit of thoughtful wishes.”  Mary Martin

What are your most constant wishes?  Have any of your wishes come true?  How did that happen?

(Many thanks to Larry today for our topic.  As usual, you all offered many good ideas, and I thank you.  Next week, I will need a word starting with “X” and that will be a challenge finding a topic that I can actually write about, so I look forward to your ideas.  Please leave them in Comment)

What do you wish for today?  No doubt we all have one common wish: end the pandemic.  While it has not stopped all our wishes from coming to fruition, it certainly has restricted many of them relating to travel, jobs, and socialization.

The large increase in patients reminds us that the wishful thinking that the virus won’t hit us so we don’t need to get the vaccine is not thoughtful wishing.  Even when we wish, we need to be aware of reality and consequences, especially if there could be danger involved.

Our wishes often determine how we see things.  When we are lonely for friends or a relationship, we may meet a person with whom we have much in common and to whom we are drawn.  With time, we may find that our wishes and reality do match and this friendship will become long-term and positive for us, but we may also find that it is not what we hoped it would be.

We May Only See The Surface

When a relationship begins well and matches our wishes, it may be difficult to see beyond those wishes.  What we have seen may only be the surface.  As the differences and difficulties arise, we need to face the situation thoughtfully.  Can these problems be fixed?  Is this relationship likely to develop in a more positive way?

In these situations, we especially need to explore our “thoughtful wishes.”  We need to think as well as feel.  Are our wishes leading us to take more time to understand the other person’s desires and needs?  Is the other person showing us respect and honoring our needs?  As long as the answers to these questions are “yes” we are letting our wishes lead us in a wise direction.

If we discover that our needs are not being met, then we need to rethink what we are doing.  We may be disappointed that the friendship is not what we had hoped, but we need to realistically evaluate to see if it is time for us to move on.

Thoughtful Wishes May Manifest

At times, our wishes may be able to help us make our dreams come true.  When I was young, my greatest wish was to become a dancer.  I could see it wouldn’t be easy since my early illness had kept me from the usual activity of childhood.  But when my high school offered modern dance, I jumped at the chance to become strong and expressive.  Over time I had to let go of wishful thinking and embrace thoughtful wishing that led to action.

By doing that, I was able to make the choices that allowed me to follow my “bliss” and take care of my health at the same time.  My wishful thinking led me to thoughtful wishing and that led me into a life I loved, a life that no one early in my life would have thought I could achieve.

Wishes May Come True

We’ve all heard the expression, “Be careful what you wish for.”  I always thought of it as a warning that made wishing rather dangerous.  If you wished for the wrong thing, it could be a disaster.  Now when I hear the phrase, I think it is saying, “Think about what you wish for and be sure it is what you want, because you are likely to get it.”

When we have had our wishes come true, becoming a doctor, an artist, a minister, or a parent, we are able to look at life more positively.  We know that our wishes can come true, but we also know that requires thought and work.

May you all experience thoughtful wishes today.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related Blog Posts:

AWAKENING TO ACCEPT REALITY

EMBRACING THE DUALITY

AWAKENING TO OUR CHOICES

 

AWAKENING TO YOUR OWN VALUE

“The value of life can be measured by how many times your soul has been deeply stirred.” Soichiro Honda

How do you measure your life’s value? Has your soul been stirred recently?  In what way? 

(Many thanks to Eleanore and Christina for our topic today.  Again, so many of you gave me such good topic ideas.  No doubt I will use some of them in the future.  For next week, I will need a topic starting with “W” so please leave your ideas under comment.  Many thanks to all who read this blog!)

In an industrial country like ours, society puts great value on success that can be seen in terms of products, popularity, or rankings.  We are considered successful when we make lots of money, own a large house, live in the more expensive parts of town, or have a prestigious job.

What rarely if ever defines success is how kind a person we are or how well we care for ourselves internally.  Of course, we each have our own value system that determines what we like or don’t like about ourselves.

Don’t Rely On Others Opinions

Bernard Hopkins says, “If you don’t know your own value, somebody will tell you your value, and it’ll be less than you’re worth.”  Now, that’s pretty negative.  Yet many of us rely too much on what others think of us and we need to remember that their assessment of us may not always be accurate.

I remember the time when I had an injury to my ankle and could walk about, but only with difficulty.  A friend drove us to a lecture.  She chose to park away from the event instead of parking right in front of the hall where there were places available.

I reminded her that it was hard for me to walk and asked her if she could move the car to a closer place.  It made her mad and she made a disparaging remark to me.  Although she did a lot of good work in the community, there was also a part of her that had always to be right and strong.

While she saw me as someone who was playing helpless, I didn’t buy into her projection.  I saw myself as making the wise decision, not putting unnecessary stress on my healing ankle.  I valued myself enough to speak up even when I knew it would not be appreciated.  In the end, she moved the car while grumbling.

Our True Self At Soul Level

 To find our real value, we must get in touch with our soul.  It is at our deepest and most valuable level.  We must allow ourselves to be touched at that level beyond emotion.  Recently, I experienced much pain as a result of a spinal procedure.  During this time, I often became so angry or upset that I had to stop and meditate and calm down because I knew I was not making the situation better.

When I did take those quiet moments, my soul was stirred.  I felt for a moment that I would be all right.  As the days with less pain arrived, I felt a little thrill, and thanked God.  My soul seemed to be telling me, “You will be okay.”  And now I am doing well.  I have only a few aches in the area around the surgery, but never any sharpness.

Others May Uplift Us

Recently, hearing about a woman who had gone through terrible experiences in a communist country and in an early marriage, I found myself in tears because of the beauty of the courage she had shown.  I was more than happy to discover the story had an uplifting ending.  My soul as well as my emotions were touched by this story.

When our soul is touched, a part of us opens, unhampered by what the people around us think or even by our own negative reflections.  The more we are touched at this level, the more we can see our true and beautiful value.

May your soul be stirred today.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related Blog Posts:

AWAKENING TO THE VALUE OF CHANGE

AWAKENING TO OUR SOUL’S GARDEN

AWAKENING TO TRUST YOURSELF

 

AWAKENING TO THE UNIVERSAL

“There is a universal, intelligent life force that exists within everyone and everything.  It resides within each of us as a deep wisdom, an inner knowing.  We can access this wonderful source of knowledge and wisdom through our intuition, an inner sense that tells us what feels right and true for us at any given moment.”  Shakti Gawain

Are you in touch with the Universal?  How do you do that?  If you do, what value does it have for you?  If not, why not?

(Many thanks to Micah and Cathy for today’s topic.  Next week I’ll be writing about a topic that begins with a “V” so if there are words starting with “V” that interest you, please leave the ideas under Comment.  Thanks so much!)

Sometimes we are so involved with ourselves and local events that we forget there is something greater.  Lately, I’ve focused on taking care of myself after back surgery and dealing with the initial pain that took every moment.  It felt like I was living in a tunnel. Now that I’m feeling better and move around easily, I’ve walked out into the light.

Deep Breaths Release Pain

What finally made the difference was my choice to look beyond this body.  I prayed, “Please release this pain from me,” as I took deep breaths, letting the exhale flow down my leg while mentally experiencing a release.  When I felt fear arise, and I usually did, I envisioned light pushing it away.

The more often I did this, the more I felt some release of pain or at the least, my fear of not recovering went away.  In those moments I moved beyond my ego and body to a universal place.

Our World Generates Fear

Even if we aren’t experiencing physical distress, the world around us is filled with anxiety-producing events.  The crazy and sad situation in Afghanistan breaks our hearts for all of those who cannot escape such a dangerous situation.  We also worry about those in other countries controlled by dictatorial leaders, and if in their fight for freedom they will survive.

The world-wide pandemic, instead of declining as we had hoped, is becoming a worse threat to our daily lives.  Despite all the scientific evidence, there are still those who refuse to be vaccinated or wear masks.  As a consequence, many of us fear going out into public places, even as the restrictions are choking our lives.

God And Nature Connect Us To The Universal

While it is important that those who can protest and work in public help people with these problems, we need to keep in mind that there is something beyond what we are experiencing on this earth.  We are all connected to a greater life force that some may call God.  We are also surrounded by the energy of Nature which is one with the universal.

Living among the lush forest of the mountains, I feel that I am part of something greater than myself.  It isn’t surprising that we refer to nature as Mother Nature, for this life force does create that which keeps us alive with food, air, and water.  Being with nature illuminates the universal and teaches us to be better stewards of our lives as well as of the Earth.

The Universal Has No Boundaries

When we are disturbed by what is happening in our family, city, or country, we need to remember that this physical life is not all there is.  There is a spirit within us that exists beyond our time on Earth.  Feeding our spirit is just as important as feeding our body.

Taking the time to walk through the forest or desert, meditating or reading spiritually uplifting material, enriches our souls and strengthens our intuition.  It allows what we know at a deeper level to rise to the surface and assist us in making the best choices for ourselves and those around us at any given moment.  The Universal knows no boundaries and can open us to its inner riches.

May the Universal guide all you do today.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related Blog posts:

AWAKENING TO BE QUIET

AWAKENING TO DEEPEN OURSELVES

AWAKENING TO THE ONENESS WITHIN

 

AWAKENING TO TENDERNESS

“Care is a state in which something does matter; it is the source of human tenderness.”  Rollo May

Do you feel tenderness is a good quality?  Are you a tender person?  How do you express that in your life?

(Many thanks to Sue for today’s topic.  Thanks to all of you who gave me suggestions.  Again, it was hard to make a decision with a list of so many good topics.  Next week the topic will begin with a “U” so please leave some suggestions for next week.  I hope you enjoy today’s post.)

We often think of tenderness in relation to touch.  A sore spot on the arm is tender.  An overworked muscle is tender.  A bruised place is tender.  In these situations, tenderness is related to injury, but it is not always a physical experience.

We all love the sight of a mother talking sweetly and lovingly to her baby or small child.  The action tells us she really cares and puts her ego aside to give full attention to this small one who needs to feel loved.  When we express tenderness, we are saying we care.

Tenderness Is Masculine and Feminine

We also often think of tenderness as a feminine quality, and there are men who will hide this quality, if they have it, because they feel it is not masculine. The truth is that tenderness is not about gender at all.  All caring human beings are tender.

My grandfather on my mother’s side was a carpenter.  While he was hacking away at wood in his shop, making items for the house or to sell, he allowed me to play with the sawdust and discarded pieces of wood.  I made fake food and doll houses and we said little to each other.  He was definitely a masculine guy building things.

But when we were relaxing together, I would curl up in his lap or next to him on the sofa and he would gently stroke my hair, talk to me softly, read the Bible or tell stories.  I learned early in life that tenderness was a part of masculinity just as it was part of the feminine.

Tenderness Shows We Care

The events of life often call us to express our caring in tender ways.  Being with a friend who has lost a loved one is certainly one of those times.  Our tenderness guides us to give hugs, cook food, and offer help in many ways.  We want those persons to know we are there to aid in any way they need us.

Letting others know that we care about them is a sign of our inner strength.  At times that strength may call us to speak up in ways that are not popular.  We have to assert our position, but when that is expressed with care, even if our words are powerful, they are a reflection of what is beneath the surface, a tenderness that respects all humanity.

Treat Ourselves With Tenderness

Not only do we need to be able to express tenderness to others, we need to be able to express it to ourselves.  When we are grieving or unhappy, we need to be gentle with ourselves, and allow ourselves to feel what we are feeling.  Shutting off these feelings because we think they are a sign of weakness or disgraceful is not wise or healthy.

Stuffing intense feelings can create mental health issues, relationship problems, and wear down our immune system. When we feel emotional, we need to acknowledge what those feelings actually are so that we can begin to understand how to deal with what created this intensity.  We must care about ourselves as well as about others.

In order to express tenderness, we must care.  In this difficult time, although we are separated by the pandemic, we are fortunate to have electronic opportunities like Zoom meetings to connect with others.  The masks we wear may cover our facial expressions, but our words and actions can still be expressions of tenderness.

May you care and be cared for with tenderness today.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related Bog Posts:

AWAKENING TO GOODNES

AWAKENING TO LOVE OURSELVES

AWAKENING TO GOOD DECISIONS

 

AWAKENING TO OUR REFLECTIONS

“The way we experience the world around us is a direct reflection of the world within.”  Gabrielle Bernstein

Do you take time to reflect on your life each day? Each week? Ever?  How does that help you?  If you don’t, why do you avoid it?  Does it make you uncomfortable?

(Special thanks to Jessie for today’s topic.  Thanks to you all for the many wonderful ideas you  gave me.  It wasn’t easy to choose, so I did some meditation and this topic came up first.  Next week I will need a topic starting with “S” so if you have some ideas, please put them in comment.)

Reflection is an inner activity and requires us to move away from the active part of our lives and look at what we are doing and thinking.  Some people are uncomfortable with this idea and value only activity, either mental or physical, but giving attention to our inner as well as outer selves creates a balance in our lives that is healthy and strengthens us in many ways.

Lack of Reflection May Be Detrimental

Being active all the time may be fun, but it may also be exhausting or confusing.  Our minds and bodies also need rest.  At times, that simply means sleep, but it may also mean reflecting on what is happening in our lives and determining if we are heading in the  right direction.

For years, most of my decisions were emotional.  That’s what guided my life and led me to be involved in two disastrous relationships.  I fell in love, and even when my rational mind tried to show me these were not good choices, I ignored it.  I also ignored the behavior of the men when their lack of devotion was obvious.  When reflection presented me with reality, I chose to think that the idea of breaking up with them was just negative thinking.

Our Inner Self Offers Wise Guidance

It is true that we have to learn to distinguish between fear and inner wisdom that warns us not to do what we may want to do.  When I learned to meditate and release my fear, I then more easily respected what my inner reflection showed me.  Even if its guidance was not what I wanted to hear, I respected it and took the time to reflect on its message.  As a result, I began to make wiser choices and felt stronger.

We are now living in an especially chaotic time.  Listening to the news invariably stirs up fear or anger and makes it difficult to even hear what is being reported.  It is almost impossible not to become disturbed, but if we connect with our inner peace, we can experience disbelief or disapproval without it throwing us off balance.

Taking the time to reflect on this news gives us the opportunity to decide what we want to do to help improve the situation, if that is possible, or to let go of the thought or anger that may harm us.  Not everyone can take action, but if we decide to do so, reflecting on the possible actions will help us make the best choice.  Just reacting to a situation is rarely a good solution.

Nature May Help Us Find Peace

The times when I feel the most reflective are during a walk in the forest or under the trees.  Being close to nature always beings me close to Spirit and opens my spiritual self to reflection.  One may also experience this fishing or floating on a lake or stream.  There is something about Nature that clears the dust and tar from our minds and offers a sweet breeze to cool our emotions and open us to positive reflection.

We have the power to enrich our inner lives and to feel love and peace, and we can reflect that out into the world, enriching the lives of all those who come in contact with us.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related blog Posts:

INSPIRATIONAL REFLECTION: DANCING DEEPER

AWAKENING THROUGH SPIRITUAL REFLECTION: WHAT DO YOU MIRROR?

AWAKENING TO COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION

 

AWAKENING TO PATIENCE

“Sometimes things aren’t clear right away.  That’s where you need to be patient and persevere and see where things lead.”  Mary Pierce.

Are you a patient person or is patience a challenge for you?  How do you stay patient when it is difficult for you?  What is the advantage of being patient?

(Thanks to Joanne for today’s topic.  Next week will be a topic starting with “Q” so please leave some words that I can use for the next blog topic.  Thanks for all your help!)

We are certainly living in a time that requires patience, but even without the pandemic and its restrictions, life always challenges us.  Unlike most of life, when we have those moments when we are physically threatened, we have to act quickly without thinking in order to protect ourselves or others.  We may not even have time to take a deep breath.

But most of life is not like that.  Being patient doesn’t mean waiting forever to see what will happen or tolerating what is harmful or unacceptable.  But it does mean taking the time to truly examine a situation in order to make the best decision about the action we should take.

As a young child I had to be patient for years.  In a way it really wasn’t an issue because my illnesses kept me in bed or limited my ability to be physically active.  By the time I reached junior high school,  I was able to do some physical activity.  I played tennis, danced, and went swimming at the local pool.  It was such a joy!

Needing to Control Makes Us Impatient

Throughout high school and college I was involved with many activities and became more impatient with life when things didn’t move along as I desired.  But at times I was forced to be patient.  I majored in drama and it’s impossible to perform in a play without considerable preparation.  You have to memorize your lines, attend many rehearsals, and learn specifically how to act and move.

Despite learning the value of patience in school, I found being patient in a work environment more challenging.  I worked in schools as a teacher and in offices in various positions.  Every situation required a period of learning what was acceptable behavior, what was quality work, and how to adjust to difficult co-workers or managers.

Determining When to Be Patience

Too much patience could be interpreted as laziness.  Too little patience could create conflicts that would lead to being fired or demoted.  But sufficient patience, at times, allowed me to eventually determine that a position or company was clearly not where I should be or that it was best to stay where I was and adjust my behavior to what was required.

When I first started teaching at a Catholic girl’s high school, I loved the disciplined atmosphere because I could really concentrate on the teaching.  However, an assistant principal observed me every week.  It made me very nervous and I was afraid she came so often because she didn’t think I was teaching very well.

With time, I realized that she was helping me become a better teacher.  She was gently teaching me more effective techniques like using group discussions and projects rather than relying on lecturing.  Her perseverance as well as mine made me a much more effective teacher in her school, but also give me the tools I would need when I went to work in inner city New Orleans.

Patience Is of Value Personally and At Work

Most of us feel unsettled when we are in a new situation, but being exposed to new situations offers us an opportunity to learn.  When I look back on my life, I can see how my lack of patience in social and work situations often hindered me in being successful.  There were times when I knew that what I wanted to say would create a problem, but I said it anyway.  No one was going to control me.

As I matured, I came to realize that at times I would say or do something that did not work for people who were close to me.  I had to take the time to evaluate the situation and perhaps discuss it with others.  While it may take time and patience to work out what I want to achieve, but having the patience to consider others is a requirement for healthy relationships.

Besides, exercising the patience to see where things will lead may lead us to unexpected joys.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related Blog Posts:

AWAKENING TO BALANCE THE MIND

AWAKENING TO THE BEAUTY OF BALANCE

DANCING TO CHALLENGING EXPERIENCE

 

AWAKENING TO YOUR ODYSSEY

“The odyssey is not going out and seeing the world:  it’s about trying to get home.”  Pete Hamill

Does your life feel like an odyssey?  What makes it such a journey?  Does it work well for you or are there aspects that you need to change? What have you learned form it?

(Thanks to so many of you for such great “O” suggestions.  Especially thanks to Marguerite for this topic.  As a former English teacher, I couldn’t resist it.  In the Comment area please leave me some topic suggestions for next week starting with “P.”  Thanks!)

Most of us read “The Odyssey” in high school or college.  Written by Homer, it was an epic poem about Odysseus wandering for ten years after the Trojan War, trying to get home.  While most of us are not warriors, although some are, we all are traveling on the adventure of life.

An odyssey is defined as an intellectual or spiritual quest or an extended adventurous voyage or trip marked by many changes of fortune.  Do any of these describe your path through life?

I found Pete Hamill’s quote very interesting because we often have to wander from the path we intended to live in order to discover our true selves.

Changes Offer Positive and Negative Experiences

In the 1970’s I was living in the Washington, D.C. area teaching dance part-time when a friend of mine told me that a college in the middle of Nebraska was hiring a dance teacher to set up a dance program.  I knew nothing about Nebraska, but I needed a better income due to my divorce and was excited by the idea of creating a modern dance minor.

I accepted the position when they offered it to me.  After the interview, an art teacher on the dance committee took me out to a bar in town where I discovered he was charming, funny, and a great dancer.  I looked forward to getting to know him.

When I moved to Nebraska, I shared a house with community arts organizer and made two other wonderful women friends very quickly.  I expected everyone to be as friendly as the few people I had originally met, but I soon discovered that people generally were very distant and rarely shared their feelings.  No matter what I did I couldn’t break through those barriers.

The art teacher and I had become very close. I fell in love with him.  Although he said he loved me, he said he needed to get out of the small town and move to Oregon.  He needed to be alone to find himself.  I continued to teach at the college, but I felt stifled in such a small place.  I missed the diversity of a city.  I knew Nebraska was not my true home.

New Experiences Help Us Grow

I moved to Denver because I could easily teach my own dance classes there and it appeared I might be able to get a part-time job at a college.  Besides, the man I loved had to fly through Denver in order to see his parents in a small town near the state line, not far from Denver.  It would be easy for him to stop and visit with me.

To some it may seem I wandered too much in the west, but the wandering was beneficial. As it turned out, making it convenient for my lover to see me never led to a commitment. However, Denver became a true home where I grew in many ways.

During my odyssey in Nebraska and Denver, places I would previously not have considered living, I grew enormously as a teacher and person.  Especially in Denver, I felt I became more of who I truly was.  Because of a Buddhist friend’s influence and a quarter  of a semester teaching dance at the Naropa Institute, I decided to learn to meditate, a practice that expanded my spiritual life and benefitted my health.

I also made hiking friends and climbed to the top of huge mountains to be awed by God’s magnificent creations.  I attended a Science of Mind church and studied its teachings.  They helped me to pay more attention to the negative thoughts I allowed to control my thinking, and I learned how to release them.

These years were a time when my odyssey led me through trials and tribulations, taught me what I needed to let go of and what must become a part of me.  This journey brought me home to who I truly am.

Unexpected Gifts Help Us Grow

 Isn’t that what happens to so many of us?  On our odyssey through life we come upon the unexpected many times.  The world around us continues to change regardless of our choices and that often affects how we live and may force us to change.  Each experience is an opportunity to learn a better way to live or to define clearly what we don’t want. We may have to change the path or destination we had planned, or the experience may reassure us that we are on the right path.

I’ve often moved to take a new job, be close to a friend or family, or be in a healthier location.  There are negative and positive aspects to that, but there is one constant.  Every situation is an opportunity to learn, to experience new people and cultures, and I am grateful because it has helped me understand my journey and other people’s life quests.

Now as I move into the last decades of my life, I feel at home, living as my true self in a place that is my soul’s home, with a man who is the partner for whom I always searched.  My life isn’t perfect but it’s been a fascinating journey that has allowed me to become who I want to be.

May your odyssey guide you home.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related Blogs:

WHERE THE JOURNEY LEAD

AWAKENING TO JOURNEY WITH GRATITUDE

AWAKENING TO THE JOURNEY THAT IS

 

 

AWAKENING TO LIFE’S MOVEMENT

“Consciousness is only possible through change; change is only possible through movement.”  Aldous Huxley

How do you feel about movement in your life?  Do you enjoy new experiences or do they make you nervous?

(Thank you, Mike, for today’s “M” word.  It definitely moved my thinking!  For next week, I need a topic that begins with “N” so please share your ideas with me in the comment box.  Thanks so much!)

At this time of year the movement of nature is almost overwhelming.  The trees are lush and full, gardens are abundant with flowers and vegetables, and where I live, the rains frequently replenish the earth.  Then, when fall and winter come, these gifts disappear.  Under the colorful leaves of autumn, acorns grow and fall to feed the bears and the arriving cold weather pushes us to get out our sweaters and coats.

Our Lives Change Like The Seasons

Aside from our need to adapt to nature’s changing seasons, the seasons of our personal lives may change too.  Couples are married, babies are born, friends and relatives pass away.  We experience accidents or illness that force us to live differently by resting more often, spending less time with friends, or helping care for those who are ill while we’re still trying to work.

How we deal with the movement in our lives may determine how much we grow.  Every change presents us with an opportunity to make new choices.  If we are afraid of change, we may miss the chance to try something new that could be a true gift.  Fear of change may also prevent us from healing wounds that have given us pain for years.

Chance Movement May Bring Gifts

A number of years ago, I felt very frustrated with my dating experiences with men.  I had been in a few relationships over the years but seemed always to be drawn to men who wouldn’t or couldn’t make a commitment to me.  Since trying to meet guys in person wasn’t working, I considered going online, but I didn’t think that was a wise approach.  How could I know if the guy was telling me the truth when I couldn’t see him in person?

Because I couldn’t think of other options, I decided to try it.  Most of the men didn’t live anywhere near me and the last thing I wanted was another long-distance relationship.  Then, one day I got an email from a man who had seen me online, was interested, but said I had disappeared from the website where he found my profile.

As it turns out, I had accidently gotten on that site and when I discovered it, I deleted my account.  But this guy didn’t give up.  He searched and found my blog and an email address.  He seemed rather interesting and we began emailing.  He was planning soon to move to a town near me.  When he did, we started dating.

This week we joyously celebrated our seventh wedding anniversary.  My true soul mate had found me accidently!  Life can be beautifully surprising!

Movement Helps Understand Others

It’s also true that some ideas we have may lead us in the wrong direction, so we have to look at the possible consequences and weed out what is dangerous or unwise.  But when the change could lead us to a better job or a better life or friendship, it is good to explore the possibilities further. The key is to keep moving instead of remaining stagnant.

Unlike many people, I don’t have a life-long connection to one place and the people living there.  Even my family has lived in different cities.  But making my home in a variety of locations has increased my consciousness of different cultures.

When I taught Native American high school students in New Mexico, some students attended school but didn’t do the work.  I learned that they had decided to follow their native culture as opposed to the “white man’s way” and attended school only until they could legally quit. While this made them more acceptable to their culture, it was difficult for them to find work and earn money to feed their families.

Often, when we have difficulty understanding the choices people make, it is because we are stuck in our own beliefs and judge the differences we see in others.  To understand the differences, we must move beyond the surface.  We must allow our minds and emotions to travel to new places.

Seeing a situation from another point of view may reveal the solution to a problem that we thought had no solution.  At the very least it will move our consciousness to a better understanding of the human condition and increase our empathy for others.

The movement of the mind is unlimited, so enjoy the universe through which it travels.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related blog Posts:

AWAKENING TO THE VALUE OF CHANGE

TRANSFORMING THE FEAR OF CHANGE

AWAKENING TO EFFECT CHANGE

 

 

 

 

 

AWAKENING TO OUR LONELINESS

“At the innermost core of all loneliness is a deep and powerful yearning for union with one’s lost self.”  Brendan Behan

Do you often experience loneliness?  How do you react to it?  Is it always a negative experience or is it sometimes positive?

(Next week my topic will start with “M” so please give me some suggestions for a word beginning with that letter.  I want to know what interests you.  Leave your idea in comment)

The fear of loneliness and the actual experience of loneliness have been a huge part of many people’s lives during the pandemic.  This is often because many are not comfortable being alone and need frequent face-to-face companionship.

Fortunately we have had Zoom which has allowed us to see others’ faces.  Although it isn’t a substitute for face-to-face communication, it is better than an email, text, or just a voice over the phone.

Loneliness Can Support Creativity

However, there are those who experience loneliness often, although they might prefer to call it solitude.  Writers and artists require alone time to do their work, to concentrate and create, using their inner skills of thinking, feeling, and imagining to create a work of art that reflects personal feelings, thoughts, or experiences.  In these situations, being alone is not loneliness.  It is a connection with a deeper part of one’s self.

When we feel alone how can we make that sense of loneliness a positive thing?  I know one person who likes to experiment making bread.  Another experiments with cooking creative dinners.  Others plant extensive gardens in their back yards.  Doing these things fills a need to express oneself and reach out to others.

Loneliness May Depress Us

Beneath the desire to abate loneliness is the need to be in touch with our deepest self or as Behan states, “one’s lost self.”  When aloneness feels depressive or frightening, it is because we are not in touch with that deeper self.  There is some part of ourselves we do not know that feels lost to us.

For most of my life, I lived alone.  Loneliness was a frequent companion, a good friend when I wanted to write.  However, most of my meals were eaten alone, except perhaps accompanied by a book or television program.  When I had an occasional dinner with friends, it was always a pleasure and filled part of that lonely spot within.

During much of my alone time as a younger person, I felt something was missing within me.  There was an unfilled space expressed as loneliness and depression.  It was a dark space that could pull me down if I let it.  Like so many, those were the times I felt sorry for myself,  curled up in a ball on the bed and cried or went to sleep.

Finding Our Lost Soul In Spirituality

I had always been a person who thought deeply and was very emotional.  I needed to find a way to bring light to that inner darkness.  I felt in touch with God but not in the deepest way until I learned to meditate.  In those deep quiet moments I found my “lost self” and I opened to the mystical warmth and love of my new relationship with God who was both masculine and feminine.

Alone time became healing time, loving-myself-time, learning time.  I no longer felt oneness with all of life just when I walked in the woods or was with friends. I learned I had become one with my “lost self” and could love myself even when no one else did.  As a result, life became rich in ways I could not have imagined before I found that missing part of myself.

May you each find your “lost self” and become best friends.  Namaste.

© 2021 Georganne Spruce

Related Posts

AWAKENING TO THE ONENESS WITHIN

AWAKENING TO YOUR TRUE SELF

AWAKENING TO BEFRIEND OURSELVES

 

AWAKENING TO OUR JUDGEMENTS

“We should not pretend to understand the world only by the intellect.  The judgement of the intellect is only part of the truth.”  Carl JunG

When do you most often make judgements about others?  What are those judgements based on?  Do they reflect how you feel as well as how you think?

(Thank you, Joanne for the word “judgement” for today’s topic.  My next blog will be based on a word that begins with “K” so please leave some suggestions in the Comment box.  Thanks for your help!)

When you notice yourself making a judgement about a person’s opinion or behavior, do you know where that judgment originates?  Is it based on what you think, what you feel, or your spiritual or political beliefs?

Webster’s definition of judgement is “the process of forming an opinion or evaluation by discerning and comparing.” This definition supports the process that includes an intellectual activity in which we recognize patterns of details, noticing their similarities or differences, and draw conclusions based on this information.

This describes a good process, a wise way of evaluating a situation and deciding the best course of action to follow.  But is this the process we often use to make a decision?  Not always.  We all have different tendencies when it comes to decision making and we all have an emotional and a spiritual self in addition to our intellect.

We Fear Being Different

Many of the racist attitudes we see in others are clearly not formed from the intellect.  Often people accept their parents’ or friends’ attitudes because that’s what one does to fit in.  We don’t want to feel separate because that feels lonely and is scary.  It may also put us in danger if we don’t follow the same path.

Last week I asked this question about integrity:  What if a woman can’t feed her children and steals food from a store so they have something to eat?  When you read that, what judgement did you make?  Your intellect might have said, “She broke the law and she should have been arrested.”  Emotionally, you may have felt sorry for her and hoped she got away with it.  Your spiritual self may have forgiven her wrong doing and prayed that she could find a way to safely feed her children.

Notice The Source Of Our Decisions

When we make a judgement, we need to be aware of the source of our decision.  Our best decisions usually come from a wholistic awareness.  We notice the intellectual, emotional, and spiritual aspects of a situation to determine what we need to do.  In this case, our whole selves are making the best decision possible.

Hopefully over time, our experiences teach us the best way to determine the basis of our actions.  That doesn’t mean we always get to do what we “want” to do.  Sometimes I’m prediabetic – just barely.  But I don’t want to be diabetic, although my mother was and my brother is.  Every day I have to  put my emotions in my pocket and choose, not the food I’m craving filled with sugar, but the food that is healthy for me.

This decision is intellectual in the sense that it is reasoned.  I am aware of the scientific evidence of the effect of sugar on people like me, but it is also emotional.  How much do I care about myself?  If I choose to harm myself, I certainly won’t feel better.  When I do what’s best for me, it becomes easier to do what’s right because I feel good about myself and want to keep feeling better.

When we care enough about our well-being to make wise and healthy decisions, we not only can accept our friends and family making their best choices, but it is easier for us to accept and support them.  If their choices are different from ours, we simply accept they have different desires and needs and don’t view their decisions as actions taken against us.

When we can see ourselves and others as a whole, we are more likely to make the wisest choices, and are more able to accept the diversity in life.

© 2020 Georganne Spruce

Related Blog Posts:

AWAKENING TO OUR PRECONCEIVED NOTIONS

AWAKENING TO WHO YOU ARE

AWAKENING TO GOOD DECISIONS

AWAKENING TO INTEGRITY